2004.11.09 03:34 PM

Mr. Binstock Resonates on XP

I'm trying to clean out the old blog pipeline and ran into a note to myself from last May regarding Andrew Binstock's May 1 Integration Watch column in SD Times titled "Not So Extreme Programming".  I'm not going to beat up on XP, as I think some of its tenets can be beneficial (I like pair programming, and there is obviously no single right way to do anything), but there were a couple of things that Mr. Binstock wrote that resonated with me, this in particular:

The fundamental problem with this approach is that software today is complex and large, so it cannot be designed properly by using the least-increment approach and hoping that a sound product will eventuate through the organic accretion of lots of small design decisions (followed up by code cleaning).

I agree.  In my experience, on anything other than trivial projects involving one or two developers, or perhaps on a few small parts of a large project, XP leads to chaos and an unsupportable tangle of evolved, mismatched code.  I believe that solid and supportable application stories, APIs, service contracts, and interchange pipelines are not grown, they're designed.  And, their implementation should be conducted in an orderly and well managed fashion.

Of course, I have control issues, and am not an XP'ert, so I might be wrong.


Comments

Richard Lowe points to a thoughtful newsgroup post on XP:

http://blogs.geekdojo.net/richard/archive/2004/11/16/4115.aspx

ewbi.develops | 2004.11.16 05:50 PM

Check-out Scot Becker's post on the subject:

http://objectrolemodeling.com/posts/269.aspx

The post is mostly about his trip to the Business Rules Forum, but it includes a great little aside about extreme/agile development. His views parallel mine (except that his are more intelligent and entertaining):

"...I’ll just say that much of my aversion is due to the proponents themselves and their tendency to make straw man and specious arguments. That, and 'extreme' programming sounds to me like someone chugging a Mountain Dew, saying 'Dude' a lot, listening to corporate Gap-punk 'music' like The Offspring, and then frantically writing code. Oh, and don’t forget the baggy pants."

Nice.

ewbi.develops | 2004.12.06 11:30 PM



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